Wind Power For Homes

Michael asks…

Q. How the electricity is produced by using wind power?

Please describe in details how do the whole mechanisms work? How it is developed? What apparatus is required? How the wind turbine is constructed and how it works? Explain me all questions by using 3d figures or images or video if available. Please guide me in the easiest way as much as possible; I want to make electricity for my home by using wind power or wind turbines what should I do? How can I achieve or construct it myself?

Windmill Farms answers:

It goes back to the concept of a current carrying conductor cutting the lines of flux in a magnetic field, just like any other generator rotated by any prime mover.

Ken asks…

Where can I buy a windmill to power just my home?

I live in the far north of New York state near the canadian border and i want to power my home with a windmill and i can’t seem to find where to buy a windmill or anything about it. Can anyone help?

Windmill Farms answers:

“Real Goods” has a wonderful catalog for all sorts of alternative energy devices. I’d try there.

Http://www.gaiam.com/realgoods/default.htm

They’ll also help you with other issues like batteries and other methods to help you keep power when the wind isn’t blowing.

My grandparents had wind power before the REA came to their farm. Even after, they still used wind power for their well. Of course, we’re talking Nebraska where the wind blows *all* the time (-:. Good luck! I think people who plan ahead will have an advantage when the oil runs out.

Carol asks…

How many Wind Turbines would you need to power a city?

I am doing a project in Science (Essay) It involves Wind Turbines and Wind power. If there is a city of 122,000 people how many wind turbines would i need???? HELP ITS DUE IN TWO DAYS!!!!
PLEASE HELP! IF YOU DO THANK YOU SO MUCH!

Windmill Farms answers:

Sounds fairly easy, unless you consider the reality. Some numbers that will help:
A normal home in a city will average about 1 kW, maybe 1.2 kW. This is about 1,000 Watts
So you are probably looking at a total average power demand of about 130,000 to 150,000 kW. In this range they start referring to power in terms of MegaWatts (MW), which equals 1000 kW. So your required average Power Demand is about 150 MW, or 15,000 kW.
The average for a single wind turbine is about 1.5 MW at full power. So if wind conditions are right — and constant — you would need about 100 Wind Turbines to supply the city.

Now the reality:
Wind is NOT constant — and is not dependable. I think you need at least about a 7 mph wind, just to begin turning the propellers. If the wind can not remain at better than 7 mph, you get ZERO power. What then? So then in addition to the wind turbines, you need at least 150 MW of “other” generation — such as Natural Gas Turbines (basically a stand alone jet engine) , or a coal fired power plant. So now you have expensive costs for “redundant” generation.
In addition — this is their “maximum” generation at say a 15 mph wind. What happens when the wind is only 10 mph? You maybe get only 50 MW when you need 150 MW. Big Problem.
Then, the biggest problem: On a hot 95 degree summer day — when everyone needs power the most — everyone is running their Air Conditioning all out. But now that is the days the wind is NOT blowing. If the wind was blowing — it would be much cooler. So on the hottest days, when the most power is required — the wind does not blow — and the wind turbines produce no power.
Then the maintenance issues are so bad on these wind turbine units that many companies are just abandoning these wind units in place, and just walking away. They are not economical at all. Without massive “Government” subsidies — free money from the Government — our tax money — no one would even touch these.
The installed costs are high — the maintenance costs to keep them running are high — there are additional cost for the “back-up” generation that they were supposed to replace, but in reality can’t replace.
It may be a Politically Correct policy right now — but in reality not a good or rational decision.

Laura asks…

How much power is required to power a large family home?

I am doing some research into setting up a wind turbine for my house. I see terms like ‘kW hours’ for energy or power consumption. If my house uses 1500kW hours of energy per week does this mean i need to run a 1500kW generator for 1 hour to satisfy my power needs?

How would i then go about sizing the required turbine needed to effectively power my home?

This is all new to me so i can see alot of follow up questions coming/

Windmill Farms answers:

In terms of system design, you need to consider the load imposed on the supply. In your question you mentioned a figure of 1500 kWh per week. This seems very high. It represents an average of 35 amps being drawn from the supply 24/7.

I have a 4 bedroom house occupied by 2 adults and the minimum load, during the night falls to 0.8 Amps and peaks on some days to around 18 Amps for very short periods, the average through the day is about 2 Amps.

One kW represents a load on the supply of about 4 amps for 240 volt supplies and about 8 on 120 volt supplies Understanding the load that is being imposed on the supply will help you to decide the dimensions of the system you need.

For local power generation (micro generation) you can use wind or water turbines dependant upon location, and you can also use peizo electric generation (solar cells), all these are referred to as primary power. In addition to this you will need storage which is in the form of batteries.

To use the battery power you will need an inverter, which generates power at mains voltage from the low voltage batteries. Additionally you will need a regulator, which controls the charge/discharge of the batteries, and is essential for efficient battery use and economical battery life.

If your system is capable of generating power surplus to your requirements, you can sell this to your grid supplier for quite a reasonable return.

Sandra asks…

How much will solar panels cost to power our home?

It would be nice to go green but it needs to make sense money wise. We have a 1,300 square foot home on the beach home with plenty of sun. Our electric bill is 100 bucks a month give or take. How much will solar panels cost and how many solar panels will we need to effectively power our home.

Windmill Farms answers:

You could easily knock 40 percent or more from your power bill by using a manual on off switch on your electric hot water heater and check efficiency of any electric refrigerator and or freezers.

Like you say, your place is on the water, wind power would be the best way to go because of onshore winds which would get you up and running for much less than solar and likely be good 24 / 7 rather than daylight only.

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